Posts Tagged "coffee"

Coffee, kickstarting rural economies in Nepal

Posted by on Aug 13, 2012 | 0 comments

Coffee, kickstarting rural economies in Nepal

At the moment I’m in Nepal, investigating the burgeoning coffee industry. I was involved with a Nepali coffee program 4-5 years back, helping with the country’s first shipments of coffee to the U.S. market (thanks to a generous buyer who was as interested in helping farmers here as he was in getting good coffee and developing a nascent export market). Now after helping out another high-end coffee company in the U.S. as they sought to learn about Nepali coffee, I’m back to see what has changed in the past few years. In between trekking in the Himalayas and riding elephants...

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Roasting in New York

Posted by on Aug 5, 2012 | 0 comments

Roasting in New York

This summer has hit record high temperatures all over the U.S., and New York is no exception–so it seem like the wrong time to experiment in the kitchen with new cooking techniques that require a hot oven. (On the positive side, the oven preheats quickly when the air in my kitchen is already a hundred degrees.) Still, a little sweat can’t stop me when I’m on a mission, and for me, coffee is a mission. Molly from Singing Rooster is responsible for it. I’ve been buying green beans from her for a while now and playing with different home roasting techniques. She recently...

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Move over, Juan Valdez…

Posted by on Dec 1, 2011 | 0 comments

Move over, Juan Valdez…

I was invited to attend a coffee summit in Haiti last week, where people from all over the country and every part of the sector came together—from farmers and coops to speculators and processors to buyers and roasters—to see if we could figure out how to restore Haitian coffee exports to the levels they were before the 1980s. To make it clear what this was all about, I should give a brief history lesson. Coffee arrived in Haiti in 1727, planted by French colonists, and within 50 years the country was producing 77 million pounds of it a year–or 40% of the world’s supply. Soon...

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